Last updated: January 29. 2014 10:15AM - 2771 Views
By - bshiles@civitasmedia.com



Horace Hunt, left, Glen Moore and Jimmy Floyd discuss the storm approaching Robeson County. Leon was expected to dump several inches of snow on Robeson County. |Bob Shiles | The Robesonian
Horace Hunt, left, Glen Moore and Jimmy Floyd discuss the storm approaching Robeson County. Leon was expected to dump several inches of snow on Robeson County. |Bob Shiles | The Robesonian
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LUMBERTON — Horace Hunt, Glen Moore and Jimmy Floyd didn’t let threatening weather stop them Tuesday morning from holding their daily meeting at the Burger King on West Fifth Street, a time they say is used to “solve all of the world’s problems.”


While most county residents were busy preparing for the worst, the three longtime friends said they had little concern about the major storm predicted to sweep across Robeson County from the south later in the day and dump several inches of snow. All Lumberton residents, they said they had seen similar storms in the past.


“I’m ready. I got everything I need to make some soup,” Moore said. “I’m just going to stay inside. I’m good for a few days.”


Hunt also said he was just going to take it easy and stay inside until the storm passes.


“I think I’ll just watch the news on TV and read the Bible,” he said. “Maybe I’ll just study a little.”


The approaching stormed, named Leon, looked to be a rare event for Robeson County, tucked as it is in the southeastern part of the state. As many as 8 inches of snow was being forecast, which could place it in the record books. Records kept by the Weather Service show that the 10 storms with greatest snowfall from 1902 to 2004 ranged from 7.5 inches in March 1902 to 14.5 inches in February 1913.


Records also indicate there was a storm in January 2011 that dumped about 7 inches of snow on Robeson County. That’s the largest amount of snow the county has seen this decade.


But for those at the Burger King on Tuesday morning, the storm they said they remember most was one in 1980 that dumped several inches of snow on Robeson County and brought everything to a standstill.


“Everything just stopped for two to three days, including I-95,” Hunt said. “I never saw anything like that. Nothing moved.”


Although Hunt and Moore agreed that they saw something good come out of the 1980 snow.


“The storm served to bring people together,” Hunt said. “People helped each other out.”


Hunt said children throughout the county will have fun if the storm expected to last into today drops as much snowfall as forecasters predict.


“Kids want this snow,” he said. “It’s lots of fun for them.”

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