Ex-Lumberton officer to head law program

Last updated: June 10. 2014 8:18AM - 3697 Views
By - bshiles@civitasmedia.com



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LUMBERTON — A former Lumberton police officer has been named as Robeson Community College’s new director of Law Enforcement Training.


Mickey Biggs, 54, replaces Wayne Coates, who recently retired.


“He has taught part-time for us for a long time,” Mark Kinlaw, an RCC vice president, told the college’s trustees on Monday. “He has a master’s degree so he can teach on the curriculum side as well as oversee continuing education. He has great rapport with all law enforcement in Robeson County.”


Biggs was a Lumberton police officer for 25 years, retiring in 2007. For the past seven years he has worked with the Criminal Investigation Division of the N.C. Department of Insurance.


In his new job, he is responsible for RCC’s Basic Law Enforcement Training Program and the administration of the college’s continuing education program for those already working in law enforcement.


“I’m excited about this,” Biggs said. “This is going to be a great challenge.”


Biggs said one of his goals is to develop and provide more on-line law enforcement courses. He said he is also working to help RCC staffers prepare for a law enforcement expo slated to be held from Oct. 24 to Oct. 26.


According to Biggs, the expo will provide classes for 300 to 400 individuals who want to further their education as police officers, firefighters, or in the field of emergency management.


“From what I have heard, this is the first time a community college in North Carolina has held this kind of event,” Biggs said.


During their meeting, the trustees also heard an update on the college’s Radiography Program, which recently became RCC’s third nationally accredited health services program.


According to Peggy Hunt, one of those administering the program, over the five years of the program’s existence 91 percent of the students passed certification testing on their first attempt.


“That’s not bad at all,” she said. “… National accreditation gives us bragging rights, so to speak. It shows our students are being excellently trained.”


In other business, the trustees on Monday:


— Learned the college’s current summer school program is being attended by 546 students, fewer the college officials had hoped for.


— Received a brief update from President Pamela Hilbert concerning the status of financial support RCC and other state community colleges are anticipating during the next state budget.


“We want our budgets the same as last year, not less,” Hilbert told the board members. “When you talk with our legislators, tell them the community colleges just want to keep their money.”


— Approved an offer from Noah Woods, the chairman of the Robeson County Board of Commissioners and an RCC trustee, that he pay the cost of sales tax on books purchased by students who are veterans. The federal government pays the cost of books for these students, but does not pay state sales tax. Until recently,the sales tax was waived.


According to Tami George, RCC’s financial director, the total cost of sales tax for these books is between $250 and $300 per semester.


Woods said the gift would be “personal,” not county money.


— Heard brief reports on the college’s Barbering Program and Law Enforcement programs from Vice President Channing Jones


— Approved bid recommendations for health care simulation classrooms and an HVAC upgrade for the kitchen in Building 13.

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