DSS bumps pay to get supervisors

By: David Bradley - Staff Writer
Connie Oxendine, a Robeson County Department of Social Services program administrator, speaks Tuesday about the supervisory crisis at the county DSS caused by state mandates on paperwork that reduce the time available to work on the problems of the children under the department’s care.

LUMBERTON — The Robeson County Department of Social Services board agreed to hike the salaries for three open positions in the hopes of easing the workloads carried by the agency’s staff.

Adding three supervisor positions would reduce the current supervisor workload, according to a PowerPoint presentation made to the board members. The supervisory positions would be raised from the ranks of regular social workers to supervisor. The pay jump would be from an average yearly base pay of $38,504.74 to an average base pay of $51,605.40.

Paperwork is increasing, and new hires are constantly being brought up to speed, said Connie Oxendine, a DSS program administrator. But a new hire needs additional assistance with the caseload, leading to more hours on the supervisor.

She said many of the supervisors work 50 to 60 hours a week.

Each new case for assistance requires a 19-page document just to get started, said Denise Fanin, a DSS program manager. That’s the beginning of the required tasks that staffers and supervisors face each day.

Case workers must check paperwork for proper content, inspect residences for safety, and document two visits with children each month, Fanin said. Multiply this by 30 to 40 families, some with five or six children, and the hours required just for paperwork may take more than 50 to 60 percent of the workers’ time.

Cases are going over their standard time frames, there are repeats of maltreatment cases, and there are 116 children who have been in care for more than a year, she said.

“The supervisor has to do so much paperwork that it takes away time to do good social work practice,” Fanin said.

Connie Oxendine, a Robeson County Department of Social Services program administrator, speaks Tuesday about the supervisory crisis at the county DSS caused by state mandates on paperwork that reduce the time available to work on the problems of the children under the department’s care.
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/web1_connie-oxendine-2-reduce_ne201852219946480.jpgConnie Oxendine, a Robeson County Department of Social Services program administrator, speaks Tuesday about the supervisory crisis at the county DSS caused by state mandates on paperwork that reduce the time available to work on the problems of the children under the department’s care.

David Bradley

Staff Writer

Reach David Bradley at 910-416-5182 or [email protected]

Reach David Bradley at 910-416-5182 or [email protected]