Shelter needs homes for adult cats

David Bradley - Staff Writer
Bill Cerase, director of the Robeson County Humane Society, gets a kiss from Newly, one 11 adult cats awaiting adoption at the Humane Society’s shelter. -

LUMBERTON — The adult cats are stacking up at the Robeson County Humane Society’s no-kill shelter, and staff is busy trying to find homes for the difficult-to-adopt felines.

They say adult cats are often a better option for adoption than kittens, although perhaps not as adorable.

The shelter, which is located at 3180 W. Fifth St., has 11 adult cats, and no room for any more, according to Mendy Morris, the shelter’s assistant director. Since the society operates a no-kill facility, the cats are there until they are adopted. The society does have a list of other no-kill shelters nearby to which it can take cats if necessary.

Some of the cats are rescues from Hurricane Matthew, which ravaged the county in October 2016, said Bill Cerase, the shelter’s director. All have been checked for FIV/FELV issues, de-wormed, and are ready to go to the right home.

The $50 adoption fee covers the cost of shots and tests already administered, Cerase said. The cats have been spayed or neutered and medical problems treated. Animals can be adopted for a lower fee from the Robeson County Animal Shelter, which is not a no-kill facility, but those animals often need shots and other costly treatments before being taken home.

Humane Society officials say adult cats have developed their personality, which could be an advantage for a potential adopting family.

“You can see what kind of cat you would get immediately,” Cerase said.

A kitten needs time to develop and learn to socialize with humans.

“Basically, with a kitten, you don’t know what you’re getting,” Cerase said.

“A lot of people choose kittens because they are cute,” said Lynn Provosty, a Humane Society volunteer. “It makes adult cats harder to place, unless there is something special about them.”

People also don’t understand that a kitten isn’t potty-trained, Cerase said, and that it can be messy before that learn to go to the litter box.

Prospective owners must first fill out an application and be approved. The Robeson County Humane Society can be reached by calling 910-738-8282.

Bill Cerase, director of the Robeson County Humane Society, gets a kiss from Newly, one 11 adult cats awaiting adoption at the Humane Society’s shelter.
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/web1_bill-with-newly-reduce_ne201865171259989-2.jpgBill Cerase, director of the Robeson County Humane Society, gets a kiss from Newly, one 11 adult cats awaiting adoption at the Humane Society’s shelter.

David Bradley

Staff Writer

Reach David Bradley at 910-416-5182 or [email protected]

Reach David Bradley at 910-416-5182 or [email protected]