Newspaper hostage-taker among those charged in raid

By: By Annick Joseph - Staff writer
Jacobs
Warriax
T. Oxendine
Godwin
Dial
E. Oxendine
Scott
M. Locklear
Jones

LUMBERTON — One of the two men who held The Robesonian newspaper employees hostage 30 years ago operated one of the three illegal casinos raided Monday that netted more than two dozen arrests, guns, drugs and illegal gaming machines, according to lawmen.

Timothy Bryan Jacobs, of 10669 N.C. 711 in Pembroke, who turns 50 today, was convicted on state kidnapping charges when he and his co-conspirator, Eddie Hatcher, forcefully entered The Robesonian office on Feb. 1, 1988, with shotguns and held up to 17 employees hostage for 10 hours.

According to N.C. Alcohol Law Enforcement, Jacobs operated the illegal casino at 129 Nancy Lane in Pembroke, one of three raided Monday. The others were located at 1345 Modest Road in Maxton and 1521 Opal Road in Red Springs. All three stayed opened 24-hours-a-day, seven-days-a-week and had armed security guards.

Jacobs was charged with five counts of gambling and five counts of possession of five or more gambling machines. He was placed under a $100,000 bond, which was met.

The other people arrested Monday face a variety of charges, including gambling, manufacturing controlled substances and money laundering.

Local, state and federal agencies conducted the raids Monday. The action was the result of a yearlong investigation called Operation Bandit.

Jerry Dean Oxendine, 59, of 3634 Philadelphus Road in Pembroke, was charged with gambling and felony possession of five or more gaming machines. Bond was set at $500,000.

Kendall Locklear, 57, of 1349 Modest Road in Maxton, was charged with possession with intent to distribute marijuana; four counts of trafficking heroin; two counts of possession of drug paraphernalia, maintaining a drug dwelling, and manufacturing marijuana; three counts of gambling; and three counts of possession of five or more gaming machines. Bond was set at $250,000.

Kendrick Dean Locklear, 21, of 1349 Modest Road in Maxton, was charged with 11 counts of gambling, 10 counts of possession of gaming equipment and one count of failure to appear. Bond was was set at $101,000.

Robert Michael Chavis, 62, of 1521 Opal Road in Red Springs, was charged with nine counts of gambling and nine counts of felony possession of five or more gaming machines. Bond was set at $100,000.

Gloria Ann Dial, 56, of 9499 Gaddys Mill Road in Maxton, was charged with gambling and possession of five or more gaming machines. Bond was set at $100,000.

Dusty Ray Godwin, 30, of 26 Dustin Drive in Pembroke, was charged with nine counts of gambling, two counts of failure to appear and eight counts of possession of five or more gaming machines. Bond was set at $104,000.

Jeremy Lee Jones, 44, of 30308 Hill Creek Road in Laurinburg, was charged with gambling, possession of five or more gaming machines and armed employee required to have firearm.

State law says security personnel can not carry a firearm unless they have met licensing and training requirements.

Jones’ bond was set at $100,000.

Perry Locklear, 44, of 5012 Old Red Springs Road in Maxton, was charged with gambling, possession of five or more gaming machines and armed employee. Bond was set at $100,000.

Torri Alexis Locklear, 24, of 2119 McGirt Road in Maxton, was charged with gambling and possession of five or more gaming machines. Bond was set at $100,000.

Edith Hardin Oxendine, 55, of 240 Harvard Road in Pembroke, was charged with felony possession of five or more gaming machines and gambling. Bond was set at $100,000.

Timmy Wayne Oxendine, 46, of 26 Dustin Drive in Pembroke, was charged with seven counts of gambling, seven counts of felony possession of five or more gaming machines and seven counts of armed employee required to have a firearm. Bond was set at $100,000.

Jazmin Scott, 21, was charged with seven counts of gambling and seven counts of felony possession of five or more gaming machines. Bond was set at $100,000.

Dustin Michael Warriax, 28, of 940 Tracey Sampson Road in Pembroke, was charged with four counts of gambling, four counts of felony possession of five or more gaming machines, and three counts of armed employee required to have firearm. Bond was set at $100,000.

Micheal Chavis, 17, of 1295 Modest Road in Maxton, was charged with possession with intent to distribute marijuana, maintaining a drug dwelling and possession of marijuana paraphernalia. Bond was set at $25,000.

Many of the accused claimed sovereign status, saying they were not subject to state and federal laws, according to law enforcement officials.

The North Carolina Alcohol Law Enforcement Branch, with the assistance the N.C. State Bureau of Investigation, the Robeson County Sheriff’s Office, the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco Firearms and Explosives, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation worked together to shut down the illegal casinos and marijuana growing sites that plagued neighborhoods throughout Robeson County.

According Sheriff Kenneth Sealey, most of the people apprehended during Monday’s raid were armed and dangerous, and had criminal records. Residents who lived near the properties expressed fear about the activities near the casinos.

Operation Bandit is a continuing investigation. More arrests in Robeson County are expected.

In 1988, Jacobs and Hatcher agreed to release the hostages they had taken at The Robesonian if then-Gov. James G. Martin ordered an investigation on their allegations of what they called “local public corruption and drug trafficking.” Jacobs and Hatcher surrendered and released all hostages unharmed.

Hatcher received an 18-year sentence for kidnapping in 1990 and was paroled in 1995. He was serving a life sentence for a 1999 murder when he died in prison.

Jacobs served 14 months of a six-year term in prison for the state kidnapping charges. Jacobs was released nearly four years after the newspaper takeover transpired.

Jacobs has since remained an Indian activist who has supported the idea that a piece of land in Greene County, where more than 900 tribal members living in Fort Nooherooka were massacred in 1713, be returned to Tuscarora ownership.

Jacobs
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_TIMOTHY-BRYAN-JACOBS_ne2018724214320271-1.jpgJacobs

Warriax
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_DUSTIN-MICHAEL-WARRIAX_ne2018724214333845-1.jpgWarriax

T. Oxendine
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_TIMMY-WAYNE-OXENDINE_ne2018724214319334-1.jpgT. Oxendine

Godwin
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_DUSTINY-RAY-GODWIN_ne2018724214334662-1.jpgGodwin

Dial
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_GLORIA-ANN-DIAL_ne201872421448270-1.jpgDial

E. Oxendine
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_EDITH-OXENDINE_ne2018724214335496-1.jpgE. Oxendine

Scott
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_JAZMIN-SCOTT_ne20187242144976-1.jpgScott

M. Locklear
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_MICHAEL-LOCKLEAR_ne2018724214454351-1.jpgM. Locklear

Jones
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_JEREMY-LEE-JONES_ne201872421449916-1.jpgJones

J. Oxendine
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_JERRY-DEAN-OXENDINE_ne2018724214423682-1.jpgJ. Oxendine

Locklear
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_PERRY-LOCKLEAR_ne2018724214455138-1.jpgLocklear

T. Locklear
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_TORRI-ALEXIS-LOCKLEAR_ne2018724214538188-1.jpgT. Locklear

Chavis
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_ROBERT-CHAVIS_ne2018724214514858-1.jpgChavis

K. Locklear
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_Kendrick-Dean-Locklear_ne2018724221510777-1.jpgK. Locklear

K. Locklear
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_KENDALL-LOCKLEAR-1_ne20187242267268-1.jpgK. Locklear

Timothy Jacobs sits with a shotgun as he watches over the 17 employees held hostage at The Robesonian in 1988. Jacobs and his co-conspirator, Eddie Hatcher, stormed in the building armed with shotguns in a protest against what they called a corrupt local government and county sheriff’s office.
https://www.robesonian.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_Timothy-Jacobs-1988_ne2018724215311822-1.jpgTimothy Jacobs sits with a shotgun as he watches over the 17 employees held hostage at The Robesonian in 1988. Jacobs and his co-conspirator, Eddie Hatcher, stormed in the building armed with shotguns in a protest against what they called a corrupt local government and county sheriff’s office.

By Annick Joseph

Staff writer

Reach Annick Joseph by calling 910-416-5165 or via email at [email protected]

Reach Annick Joseph by calling 910-416-5165 or via email at [email protected]